Universal Development Goals – Regional and Local Implementation

Due to the considerable difficulties and logjams existing at the global level, the Foundation is increasingly exploring whether – and which – challenges can, perhaps, be addressed more effectively at other levels. It thus aims to sharpen the focus on the interplay between the global, regional, national and local levels. A further question to be considered in this context is to what extent global (or national) omissions can be rectified regionally or locally.
With a view to the post-2015 agenda, this programme area considers the requirements for future-proof sustainable development at sub-national level and its relevance for peaceful human relations.

Here, the key question is how universal development goals that are agreed at the international level can be translated to the regional and local contexts. While recognising the need for careful differentiation among actors and specific regional/local contexts, this programme area aims primarily to promote transnational dialogue on shared challenges and solutions; in other words, to foster global learning communities at the sub-national level.

Global spheres of action and the interplay between the regional and the local experience are of particular interest, also in light of the subsidiarity principle.




The Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and the Institute for Development and Peace (INEF) are launching a new publications series: GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS. The new series aims to identify options for international policy action in an ever more complex world. Furthermore, it presents perspectives from different world regions. The series analyses current developments and challenges against the background of long-term political trends, and it illustrates facts with figures and tables. GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS is issued by a team of co-editors from different world regions. For more information, see our press release.

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Cooperation in a Post-Western World


The Western liberal order finds itself in deep crisis. Global power shifts are accelerating. What does this mean for the future of global cooperation? How can the wish for more national autonomy be reconciled with the need to cooperate in a globalised world? Can new forms of governance contribute to sustaining global cooperation? Michèle Roth and Cornelia Ulbert discuss these questions in the first issue of the new publication series GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS.

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How to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform


The urgently needed UN Security Council reform has been stuck for decades. Without a far-reaching structural change that includes the end of permanent seats and the veto, the Council is fading into irrelevance. But at a time of great power transitions, multipolarity without sufficient multilateralism is a dangerous trend. Therefore, in GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS 02|2018, Jakkie Cilliers calls for a political and intellectual leap to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform.

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Global Food Governance


After the food riots around the world in 2007/2008, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) was reformed. Since then, the CFS has developed into an innovative global policy forum that could be a role model for other Global Governance institutions. In the current evaluation process, however, the CFS also faces a number of challenges. What are the main characteristics of the CFS? How can it prove successful in a changing political environment? Nora McKeon answers these questions in the Global Governance Spotlight 2|2018 and exhorts member governments to value and reinforce this unique policy forum.

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