Global Governance Spotlight 5|2013

Transparency in the Resource Sector. The basis for sustainable development

Raimund Bleischwitz

June 2013; 4 pages

Global Governance Spotlight 5|2013 (pdf-file)

When a country quadruples its tax revenue over the course of a single year, it’s time to sit up and take notice. That’s the scale of the revenue increase achieved by African mining country Ghana from its extractive industries from 2010 to 2011. How was this possible? It’s largely down to the international rules on improved financial transparency in the energy and resource sectors, which significantly reduce the opportunities for tax evasion. These rules, known as the Dodd-Frank Act, and the standards set by the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) feature on the agenda for the forthcoming G8 Summit hosted by the British Government at Lough Erne in Northern Ireland on 17-18 June 2013. This issue of Global Governance Spotlight outlines the new rules and the stage reached in their implementation, and considers the challenges facing resource-rich developing countries and the extractive industries, as well as the role of the U.S., Germany and the EU in this context. It concludes with policy recommendations, which focus on the international action required to curb the misuse of profits from the extractive industries and on better ways of institutionalising these measures. It also considers how the global interaction
between land, energy, food, water and minerals (= the resource nexus) can be utilised to improve the knowledge base for decision-makers.


Strengthening Social Security in Africa


Numerous African countries have adopted measures to improve social protection in recent years. And a large number of relevant initiatives have been established at both regional and continental level. How successful are they and what are the challenges associated? What has to happen for initiatives to be effective on a broader scale? And what kind of support can the international community provide? We will discuss these questions with experts from politics, academia, business and civil society during this year’s Potsdam Spring Dialogues on 19/20 April 2018. Register now!

:further info here

Current challenges for democracies


In February 2018, the first Dresden Forum for International Politics took place. The new series is co-organised by the sef:, the Free State of Saxony, Engagement Global gGmbh and Foundation Frauenkirche Dresden. Around 80 experts from different world regions discussed current challenges for democracy. They focused on how to create and sustain peaceful societies in democracies. Read the conference report and further coverage online now!

:further info here



The Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and the Institute for Development and Peace (INEF) are launching a new publications series: GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS. The new series aims to identify options for international policy action in an ever more complex world. Furthermore, it presents perspectives from different world regions. The series analyses current developments and challenges against the background of long-term political trends, and it illustrates facts with figures and tables. GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS is issued by a team of co-editors from different world regions. For more information, see our press release.

:further info here

Cooperation in a Post-Western World


The Western liberal order finds itself in deep crisis. Global power shifts are accelerating. What does this mean for the future of global cooperation? How can the wish for more national autonomy be reconciled with the need to cooperate in a globalised world? Can new forms of governance contribute to sustaining global cooperation? Michèle Roth and Cornelia Ulbert discuss these questions in the first issue of the new publication series GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS.

:further info here

How to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform


The urgently needed UN Security Council reform has been stuck for decades. Without a far-reaching structural change that includes the end of permanent seats and the veto, the Council is fading into irrelevance. But at a time of great power transitions, multipolarity without sufficient multilateralism is a dangerous trend. Therefore, in GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS 02|2018, Jakkie Cilliers calls for a political and intellectual leap to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform.

:further info here