Climate Finance after the Paris Agreement. New directions or more of the same?

Paula Castro/Carola Betzold

May 2016; 4 pages

Global Governance Spotlight 3|2016 (pdf)

In December 2015, a new climate agreement was delivered in Paris. In substantial terms, it managed to break the over 20-year old strict separation of the world into developed (“Annex I”) and developing (“non-Annex I”) countries in terms of their mitigation commitments, and marked a paradigm change from the Kyoto-Protocol-style top-down mandatory absolute emission reduction targets to a more bottom-up system of voluntary pledges of diverse types. Climate finance has remained a crucial component of the agreement.

In the Global Governance Spotlight 3|2016, Dr Paula Castro and Dr Carola Betzold discuss where the Paris Summit has moved forward regarding climate finance – if it did move forward at all. They focus on three central issues: the overall volume of climate finance, its sources and its distribution. Further, they give recommendations how to make climate finance commitments credible.

Particularly after the contentious NATO-led intervention in Libya in 2011, established and emerging powers are pit against each other in the debate regarding intervention for the protection of individuals’ human rights. While established powers prioritize intervention and see military force as a useful tool, emerging and postcolonial states see non-intervention as a crucial guarantee of their autonomy, and favour non-military means of assistance. In the current Global Governance Spotlight Prof Dr Kai Michael Kenkel argues why the support of both, states from the Global North and South, is necessary to re-establish the legitimacy and effectiveness of the “responsibility to protect” (R2P) and gives recommendations how the debate might be invigorated.


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In February 2018, the first Dresden Forum for International Politics took place. The new series is co-organised by the sef:, the Free State of Saxony, Engagement Global gGmbh and Foundation Frauenkirche Dresden. Around 80 experts from different world regions discussed current challenges for democracy. They focused on how to create and sustain peaceful societies in democracies. Read the conference report and further coverage online now!

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The Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and the Institute for Development and Peace (INEF) are launching a new publications series: GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS. The new series aims to identify options for international policy action in an ever more complex world. Furthermore, it presents perspectives from different world regions. The series analyses current developments and challenges against the background of long-term political trends, and it illustrates facts with figures and tables. GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS is issued by a team of co-editors from different world regions. For more information, see our press release.

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The Western liberal order finds itself in deep crisis. Global power shifts are accelerating. What does this mean for the future of global cooperation? How can the wish for more national autonomy be reconciled with the need to cooperate in a globalised world? Can new forms of governance contribute to sustaining global cooperation? Michèle Roth and Cornelia Ulbert discuss these questions in the first issue of the new publication series GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS.

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How to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform


The urgently needed UN Security Council reform has been stuck for decades. Without a far-reaching structural change that includes the end of permanent seats and the veto, the Council is fading into irrelevance. But at a time of great power transitions, multipolarity without sufficient multilateralism is a dangerous trend. Therefore, in GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS 02|2018, Jakkie Cilliers calls for a political and intellectual leap to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform.

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