Climate Finance after the Paris Agreement. New directions or more of the same?

Paula Castro/Carola Betzold

May 2016; 4 pages

Global Governance Spotlight 3|2016 (pdf)

In December 2015, a new climate agreement was delivered in Paris. In substantial terms, it managed to break the over 20-year old strict separation of the world into developed (“Annex I”) and developing (“non-Annex I”) countries in terms of their mitigation commitments, and marked a paradigm change from the Kyoto-Protocol-style top-down mandatory absolute emission reduction targets to a more bottom-up system of voluntary pledges of diverse types. Climate finance has remained a crucial component of the agreement.

In the Global Governance Spotlight 3|2016, Dr Paula Castro and Dr Carola Betzold discuss where the Paris Summit has moved forward regarding climate finance – if it did move forward at all. They focus on three central issues: the overall volume of climate finance, its sources and its distribution. Further, they give recommendations how to make climate finance commitments credible.

Particularly after the contentious NATO-led intervention in Libya in 2011, established and emerging powers are pit against each other in the debate regarding intervention for the protection of individuals’ human rights. While established powers prioritize intervention and see military force as a useful tool, emerging and postcolonial states see non-intervention as a crucial guarantee of their autonomy, and favour non-military means of assistance. In the current Global Governance Spotlight Prof Dr Kai Michael Kenkel argues why the support of both, states from the Global North and South, is necessary to re-establish the legitimacy and effectiveness of the “responsibility to protect” (R2P) and gives recommendations how the debate might be invigorated.

NEWS

The Global Refugee Crisis: Towards a just response

NEW ISSUE PUBLISHED

With their effort to keep refugees and migrants out of their territories, Western nations abdicate their historical and political responsibility, according to the analysis of the renowned Indian migration researcher B.S. Chimni in GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS 03|2018. Chimni therefore calls for a just response from the international community to the global refugee crisis. Such a response could only consist of a multidimensional strategy that had to be worked out in a genuine dialogue between all stakeholders.

:further info here

How to defend digital rights?

REPORT ONLINE

Internet freedom is threatened in many states by restrictions to net neutrality or by governments shutting down internet applications. But there are rays of hope. In different world regions, civil society is mobilizing to protect net neutrality. sef: discussed activists’ experiences from different world regions with ´Gbenga Sesan from Nigeria and Thomas Lohninger from Austria during a roundtable talk at the Deutsche Welle Global Media Forum.

Read the most important results of the discussion in our short report

:further info here