Berlin Summer Dialogue 2016

© UNHCR/P. Taggart

Displacement and Forced Migration –
Rethinking prevention

Berlin Town Hall
29-30 June 2016

In 2015, the number of refugees and displaced persons worldwide reached over 60 million. Most remain inside their own national borders as internally displaced persons (IDPs) or flee to neighbouring countries. Only a very small number have so far sought refuge in Europe. Nonetheless, due to the surge in refugee numbers last year and the often dramatic circumstances in which they attempt to reach safety, which attracts considerable media coverage, there has been a noticeable shift in public attitudes in Europe and the pressure for action to be taken has increased. In addition to the question of how the refugees are initially to be cared for and subsequently integrated, the focus has shifted towards “tackling the causes of migration”. In media reports and political debates, however, the meaning of the phrase often remains unclear. A closer look at the situation reveals that the causes of displacement and forced migration are diverse and often interlinked. People leave their homes because their lives are at risk from war and armed conflict or because they lose their livelihoods, perhaps as a result of environmental change or the effects of international policy. The spread of Islamist groups in various countries also plays a role.

This year’s Berlin Summer Dialogue will provide a forum for debate about the underlying causes of displacement and forced migration and ways of tackling them – beyond short-term financial assistance and humanitarian aid. What role is played by international politics, e.g. trade or climate policy, in this context? Which political conditions in the countries of origin force people to leave their homes? What can the international community do to improve the situation in these countries? What measures can be taken in the host countries to create prospects for local communities but also for refugees – who often stay for many years – with a view to preventing further movements of people? And how can existing mechanisms be interlinked and refined to make them more sensitive to displacement and forced migration?


Strengthening Social Security in Africa


Numerous African countries have adopted measures to improve social protection in recent years. And a large number of relevant initiatives have been established at both regional and continental level. How successful are they and what are the challenges associated? What has to happen for initiatives to be effective on a broader scale? And what kind of support can the international community provide? We will discuss these questions with experts from politics, academia, business and civil society during this year’s Potsdam Spring Dialogues on 19/20 April 2018. Register now!

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Current challenges for democracies


In February 2018, the first Dresden Forum for International Politics took place. The new series is co-organised by the sef:, the Free State of Saxony, Engagement Global gGmbh and Foundation Frauenkirche Dresden. Around 80 experts from different world regions discussed current challenges for democracy. They focused on how to create and sustain peaceful societies in democracies. Read the conference report and further coverage online now!

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The Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and the Institute for Development and Peace (INEF) are launching a new publications series: GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS. The new series aims to identify options for international policy action in an ever more complex world. Furthermore, it presents perspectives from different world regions. The series analyses current developments and challenges against the background of long-term political trends, and it illustrates facts with figures and tables. GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS is issued by a team of co-editors from different world regions. For more information, see our press release.

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Cooperation in a Post-Western World


The Western liberal order finds itself in deep crisis. Global power shifts are accelerating. What does this mean for the future of global cooperation? How can the wish for more national autonomy be reconciled with the need to cooperate in a globalised world? Can new forms of governance contribute to sustaining global cooperation? Michèle Roth and Cornelia Ulbert discuss these questions in the first issue of the new publication series GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS.

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How to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform


The urgently needed UN Security Council reform has been stuck for decades. Without a far-reaching structural change that includes the end of permanent seats and the veto, the Council is fading into irrelevance. But at a time of great power transitions, multipolarity without sufficient multilateralism is a dangerous trend. Therefore, in GLOBAL TRENDS. ANALYSIS 02|2018, Jakkie Cilliers calls for a political and intellectual leap to overcome the impasse in UN Security Council reform.

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