Work programme for 2015 – 2020

© Stockfoto/lightwise

The end of history has not yet arrived. On the contrary, the world is changing ever more rapidly. Transnational problems are increasing, and many of the potential solutions and cooperative structures which looked promising only a few years ago are failing to produce results. Changed power relations are bringing new actors with different interests into play. This has a direct impact on the normative bases of global governance. The rules established by the Western powers are being rejected or at least challenged, but no consensus on new rules has emerged. The content, scope and universality of human rights are as controversial as the concept of national sovereignty, and even the – hitherto widely accepted – norms of international law are coming under pressure.

In parallel, the forums in which such questions were traditionally discussed, and which in most cases reflect the former dominance of Western actors, are being called into question. In their stead, a multitude of new and often informal forums, coalitions and groupings has formed. As a result, there is very little agreement among the world’s countries about the topics that should be addressed and the objectives that should be achieved, or indeed about the arenas in which these discussions should take place.

What’s more, non-state actors are steadily gaining in importance in many fields of relevance to global public goods. The logical imperatives guiding these players’ actions and cooperation are highly diverse, further increasing the complexity of, and creating fundamental challenges for, global governance.
Through its work, the Foundation explores and addresses these crises and challenges. The Foundation also stands for visionary thinking, prompting it to analyse the extent to which current global political changes offer new opportunities and how they can be utilised.

The African continent has been a regional focus of the Foundation’s interest for many years, and this will continue in future. A stated aim of the Potsdam Spring Dialogues is to follow African regional initiatives, and the Foundation therefore attaches great importance to dialogue with African experts in its other projects and programmes as well, wherever this is compatible with its thematic agenda.

The Foundation’s work focuses on three programme areas. The first deals primarily with the normative issues outlined above, while the other two have a thematic focus:

  1. Normative Challenges in Global Governance
  2. Universal Development Goals – Regional and Local Implementation
  3. International Responsibility in Crises and Conflicts
NEWS
10 February 2017

sef: Brussels Symposium 2017

11 January 2017

Bonn Symposium 2016

09 November 2016

sef: Study