Dr Dietmar Bartsch

© DBT/Inga Haar

“As if we had learned nothing from the Cold War, European governments, NATO and all the sabre-rattlers are gambling away people’s trust in a peaceful and just future for all. Military stockpiling is once again the order of the day, and even development policy shows no sign of any sustainable shift towards a humane and equitable economy. In the words of the Left Party’s former Chair Lothar Bisky, who sadly died far too young, ‘Peace is the spearhead of the social agenda.’ That’s why the struggle for peace and for a fair and equitable world economic order is the key to development on every continent – and why it is so important that people stay engaged and do not allow their hopes of a better future to be destroyed.”

Dr Dietmar Bartsch
Chair of the Left Party parliamentary group, German Bundestag, Berlin


30th Anniversary of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

On 10 September 1986, in the International Year of Peace, a group of dedicated politicians, researchers and publicists established the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:). They aimed at establishing an independent and nonpartisan forum to debate global interdependences. Furthermore, it was supposed to contribute to powerful political action while taking into account the realities of the One World. The objectives set out by the founding Executive Committee chaired by Willy Brandt in 1986 still apply today:

“We are united by the vision of a world without borders and without prejudice, without hunger or fear of destruction. We know that this vision will not become a reality today or tomorrow. But we wish to commit ourselves to making our way, step by step, towards that goal. The future of humankind depends on regarding ourselves as world citizens and on our acting with a sense of global responsibility.”

On the occasion of its 30th anniversary, the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) asked internationally renowned political practitioners as well as academic experts what sef’s founding vision means to them today.

Peter Altmaier, MP

Peter Altmaier, MP

© CDU/CSU-Bundestagsfraktion/Christian Doppelgatz

“The challenges of today’s world call for innovative solutions in development, peace and security – three fields that are inextricably linked and whose interdependence has been recognised by the international community in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. A world without equality will never be peaceful, while an unsafe world also poses a threat to sustainable development.
The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides us with both inspiration and concrete targets on the path to security, sustainable development and peace, defining us all as global citizens with a shared responsibility for the world. The founding idea of the Development and Peace Foundation is thus as valid today as it was 30 years ago. Let us work together, in Germany and in the world, to put this idea into practice each and every day.”

Peter Altmaier, MP
Federal Minister, Head of the Federal Chancellery, Berlin

Amin Awad

Amin Awad

© sef:

“The international refugee protection system emerged from the horrors of two world wars, yet we still live in a world which has not realized peace. In a time of increasing conflict, displacement, and disillusionment, the founding principles of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) are more relevant than ever. In recent years, more people endured displacement for longer periods of time, and the protracted nature of many crises leave more than 60 million displaced persons without hope for solutions. We are witnessing the highest displacement numbers since World War II. World leaders of this generation must respond with strength, principles, and determination to put an end to conflict, the North-South divide, and violations of human rights. Not surprisingly, Willy Brandt said it best: ‘Peace, like freedom, is no original state which existed from the start; we shall have to make it.’”

Amin Awad
UNHCR Director of the Middle East and North Africa Bureau, and Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Syria and Iraq emergencies, Amman

Dr Dietmar Bartsch

Dr Dietmar Bartsch

© DBT/Inga Haar

“As if we had learned nothing from the Cold War, European governments, NATO and all the sabre-rattlers are gambling away people’s trust in a peaceful and just future for all. Military stockpiling is once again the order of the day, and even development policy shows no sign of any sustainable shift towards a humane and equitable economy. In the words of the Left Party’s former Chair Lothar Bisky, who sadly died far too young, ‘Peace is the spearhead of the social agenda.’ That’s why the struggle for peace and for a fair and equitable world economic order is the key to development on every continent – and why it is so important that people stay engaged and do not allow their hopes of a better future to be destroyed.”

Dr Dietmar Bartsch
Chair of the Left Party parliamentary group, German Bundestag, Berlin


Professor Kurt Biedenkopf

Professor Kurt Biedenkopf

© Frank Ossenbrink Media

“There was a time, after the division of Germany and Europe and the Balkan wars had ended, when we began to hope for lasting peace in Europe. After all that Europe had experienced, would we be able to find our way back to reason and responsibility for the continent entrusted to us? It was a great hope – but so far, we have failed to live up to its demands. That is why, time and again, the Development and Peace Foundation justifies its existence and mandate. I hope that the Foundation will continue to mobilise people in support of its goals – even though achieving them sometimes seems a hopeless task. But by striving for them nonetheless, we keep alive the hope that we can couple development and peace for the benefit of humankind.”

Professor Kurt Biedenkopf
Former Minister-President; founding member of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:), Dresden

Friedhelm Boginski

Friedhelm Boginski

© Friedhelm Boginski

“The world is growing together, with the result that life itself and the challenges that lie ahead are becoming increasingly complex. The way in which we respond to these developments and the principles which guide us – in other words, the question: ‘How do we shape our future and our world?’ – are fundamental in shaping our co-existence now and in future. Cities and the local and regional policies that emanate from them are increasingly orientating themselves to global sustainable development policies such as Fair Trade and taking the global political dimension into account. They must also embrace their role as a driving force and a source of impetus and inspiration. Nothing will be remote or take place in a vacuum anymore. The local level is becoming part of our One World, with cities and urban society a mirror image of the world and a model for community relations, resulting in more responsibility for them. Cities are thus becoming an ever-evolving learning and teaching space but also the foundation for stable and sustainable global development (policy).”

Friedhelm Boginski
Mayor of Eberswalde; member of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Professor Lothar Brock

Professor Lothar Brock

© Lothar Brock

“International cooperation to safeguard global public goods and to make them accessible to everybody is a precondition for a life in dignity for all. The Sustainable Development Goals, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2015, offer a new frame of reference and starting points for moving ahead. However, good things do not always prevail because they are good. They have to be advocated against greed and opportunism not only in the policies of others but in our own, too.  Defending our interests while recognizing those of others, is a delicate balancing act. We never can be sure that it will work. Providing insights to this avail and building trust in the possibility of success: this is where the Development and Peace Foundation makes a vital contribution.”

Professor Lothar Brock
Senior Professor at Goethe University Frankfurt; Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Professor Peter Brandt

Professor Peter Brandt

© Peter Brandt

“A mid-term review of the European integration process since the late 1980s is bound to produce mixed results. On the one hand, the successes have continued: after the collapse of the communist dictatorships in Eastern Europe, the EU embarked on various rounds of enlargement, demonstrating its continued appeal and helping to overcome Europe’s former division into separate blocs. Legal, political and, to an even greater extent, economic integration has advanced. But we can see growing Euro-scepticism in many member states due to the European Union’s ongoing democratic deficit and its elitism, which is in a class of its own. What’s more, the EU has little capacity to act on a number of key issues, and the neoliberal bias of its economic agenda, which was evident from the start, is now much stronger than it was 30 years ago. In practice, the EU often acts as a transmission system for the globalisation of the financial markets rather than as a space to protect and promote a specifically European model of culture and democracy of which the social welfare state is an inseparable part. But it is defending and developing this model that constitutes Europe’s most important global mission.”

Professor Peter Brandt
FernUniversität in Hagen

Elmar Brok, MEP

Elmar Brok, MEP

© Elmar Brok

“The countries of Europe can only thrive in our globalised world if they stand together – and here, the European Union offers the best model for the future. National and EU interests are not mutually exclusive – on the contrary, they complement each other, especially in the global context and from a long-term perspective. In our changing world – with the shift away from a Western-centric to a multi-polar order, both economically and politically – the EU has yet to find its place and speak with one voice beyond its borders. But this is an urgent necessity, especially in light of the major challenges facing the international community, such as climate change, development problems, for example in Africa, refugee movements, terrorism, domestic and external security and digitalisation. The same applies to our role in international institutions. We Europeans must present a united front if we are to have a role in shaping the world order in the 21st century and in influencing the new economic, social and security architecture. Only by pooling national sovereignty do we Europeans have any chance, in the present situation, of regaining sovereignty for our people.”

Elmar Brok, MEP
Chair of the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs, Brussels

Dr Jakkie Cilliers

Dr Jakkie Cilliers

@ ISS

“The world is changing, but not the UN Security Council (UNSC). After its 1965 enlargement, reform has been on the agenda of the General Assembly since 1979. Yet, there is no prospect for reform through the intergovernmental negotiations in New York. Without any progress, the UNSC will delegitimise the entire UN system blocking progress and efficiency at many other levels. An integrated and interdependent world needs a different approach that places global concerns first. A UNSC where members are more clearly elected and therefore representative of their regions has the promise to provide such a different approach. It will likely result in a more cautious Council than one dominated by Western powers, but one whose authority and decisions will carry much more force and legitimacy. Perhaps its time for civil society and the business community to take up this issue?”

Dr Jakkie Cilliers
Chairperson, African Futures & Innovation, Institute for Security Studies, Pretoria

Tanja Gönner

Tanja Gönner

@ GIZ

“Development needs security – the certainty of being able to live one’s life under the rule of law in a society in which relations are based on mutual respect. Development needs responsibility – and that means an international community which can be relied on to advocate for cohesion and protection. Development promotes peace. That’s what we work on at GIZ – every day, all over the world. For 30 years, the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) has provided valuable expertise in this context. Congratulations – keep up the good work!”

Tanja Gönner
Chair of the Management Board, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, Frankfurt am Main/Bonn

Dr Maja Göpel

Dr Maja Göpel

© sef:

“Mystics in every religion assign those alive today a responsibility for future generations and guardianship of our natural resources. Many indigenous traditions are mindful, in their decision-making, of the need to work for the benefit of the seventh generation into the future and to respect Mother Earth. The individualistic growth paradigm that gained currency in the 20th century has driven both these concepts out of politics and the economy, despite 40 years of the sustainable development agenda. Today, political impotence and the crisis of purpose have taken such a firm hold that reflecting on the rights of future generations and the conservation of nature can have a transformative and even liberating effect: away from the dictates of short-term competition and profit-driven accumulation which have wiped out any sense of proportion, inner peace, commitment to our shared world and often even compassion. Our task, over the next 30 years, is to use this crisis as an opportunity.”

Dr Maja Göpel
Head of the Berlin Office of the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy;
Member of the Advisory Board of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Professor Mo Hamza

Professor Mo Hamza

© Mo Hamza

"One look at the state of the world thirty years on from the vision of the Development and Peace Foundation’s founding committee and we can see how much it is being challenged and put to the test. From the refugee crisis, the conflicts and state failures that produced them, to the mounting pressure exerted by climate change, staying ‘…united by the vision of a world without borders and without prejudice’ is a call that can’t be emphasised enough at these trying times. While we made significant leaps and bounds in risk reduction to natural calamities with global initiatives such as the Hyogo and the Sendai Frameworks, and efforts on the Sustainable Development Goals, we still need to stay the course for a united world against the rising tide of populist and isolationist movements. It’s only their vision that would stand up against rolling back the clock."

Professor Mo Hamza
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety, Lund University

Trudi Hartzenberg

Trudi Hartzenberg

© sef:

“An important milestone, since the sef: was founded in 1986, is the crafting of a multilateral rules-based system of trade governance, in the form of the World Trade Organisation. It is also true that alongside this achievement, the proliferation of regional trade agreements has shown no signs of slowing down. For African countries, these developments serve to underscore, first, the importance of their own integration agenda; in particular as regards Africa's most ambitious integration project, the Continental Free Trade Area (CFTA). The CFTA can mark a watershed in African integration, by shaping an agenda that addresses current and emerging investment, production, trade and development issues. Second, these developments emphasize that African countries need to ensure that the regional trade and economic partnership agreements that they conclude with external partners reflect their development priorities, and 21st century economic realities. Africa cannot prosper in isolation. The development prospects for African countries are inextricably linked to the rest of the global economy. Negotiating the terms for Africa's integration and the terms for engaging its global partners must reflect a 21st century agenda secured in rules-based governance regimes; transparent, predictable, legally certain, with effective dispute resolution provisions.”

Trudi Hartzenberg
Executive Director, t r a l a c - Trade Law Centre NPC, Stellenbosch

Professor Uwe Holtz

Professor Uwe Holtz

© ZEF, Uni Bonn

“The global governance project has achieved mixed results: some progress, but also stagnation and setbacks. In view of the numerous and diverse problems facing us today, its realisation is in crisis. But there are also positive milestones on the path towards governance policies as a basis for action at the global, regional and national level: the new climate agreement and, above all, the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, which is the UN General Assembly’s global roadmap with transformative 17 goals to overcome the longstanding divisions between North and South and between industrialised and developing countries. The Agenda commits the international community, all countries and stakeholders to work towards a better world, in line with a dictum which is still valid today: ‘To shape the world’s future in peace and welfare, in solidarity and dignity’ (Willy Brandt 1980). This pragmatic vision needs corresponding political will at all levels and the support of the broadest possible multi-stakeholder alliances. Participating in this endeavour and developing practical proposals for new forms of global governance and administration – based on the paradigm of sustainable, free, human rights-based development and on the regulatory framework of a social and ecological market economy –, and opening them up to debate, will be one of the foremost tasks of the Development and Peace Foundation.”

Professor Uwe Holtz
University of Bonn; former MP;
Founder member of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) and member of the Board of Trustees

Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Wolfgang Huber

Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Wolfgang Huber

[Translate to English:] © Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study

[Translate to English:] Ich halte an der Hoffnung fest, dass eine freiheitliche Ordnung eine verheißungsvolle Perspektive für die bunte Staatenwelt des 21. Jahrhunderts ist. Ich kenne die Einwände: Angesichts der sozioökonomischen Disparitäten hat die Gerechtigkeit den Vorrang vor der Freiheit; und: Wir Angehörigen des westlichen Teils des globalen Nordens sollen uns nicht einbilden, wir könnten unsere Lebensform in andere Weltgegenden exportieren. Doch die Entgegensetzung von Freiheit und Gerechtigkeit kommt mir von Jahr zu Jahr immer unglaubwürdiger vor; vielmehr ist doch Gerechtigkeit nichts anderes als eine Ordnung, die sich dem gleichen Zugang aller zur Freiheit verpflichtet weiß. Diese Verpflichtung ergibt sich aus universalen Menschenrechten und nicht aus Besonderheiten der westlichen Kultur. Als Christ halte ich daran fest, dass alle – Christen wie Nichtchristen – mit der gleichen Würde begabt sind. Deshalb versuche ich nicht nur selbst, Weltbürger zu sein, sondern freue mich über jede Begegnung mit Weltbürgern aus der südlichen Hemisphäre des Globus. Solche Perspektiven zu eröffnen, ist nach wie vor unerlässlich; die Stiftung Entwicklung und Frieden hat nach dreißig Jahre noch viele wichtige Aufgaben vor sich.

Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. Wolfgang Huber, Bischof i.R.
Ehemaliger Ratsvorsitzender der Evangelischen Kirche in Deutschland (EKD)

Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger

Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger

© MSC

“Today, the international community is faced with a new boundlessness of conflict. But instead of working together to find solutions, more and more countries – even within the EU – are retreating behind national borders, putting the future of the global security order at risk. We need more, not less, diplomacy, integration and cross-border cooperation if we are to respond effectively to the numerous crises confronting us today. So above all, we must strengthen the institutions that foster regional and international cooperation, such as the European Union, the United Nations and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, for the long term by adopting often urgently needed reforms.”

Ambassador Wolfgang Ischinger
Chairman of the Munich Security Conference; Senior Professor for Security Policy and Diplomatic Practice, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin

Ulrich Kelber, MP

Ulrich Kelber, MP

© Frank Nürnberger

“The vision of a peaceful world without borders and without prejudice is still valid today. Our world has changed greatly over the past 30 years. Many conflicts have been resolved peacefully – but others have erupted. War, hunger, fear, destruction and suffering are, sadly, all too frequent. That’s why we continue to need committed individuals working outside the day-to-day business of politics to show us what the aim of politics should be: a peaceful world.”

Ulrich Kelber, MP
Parliamentary State Secretary at the German Federal Ministry of Justice and Consumer Protection, Berlin; member of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Roderich Kiesewetter, MP

Roderich Kiesewetter, MP

© Roderich Kiesewetter

“The global security order must be strengthened through more intensive efforts to create international understanding. The United Nations bears the prime responsibility for building an international order based on fair rules. In a world which increasingly faces ‘challenges without borders’, strengthening the regions must also form part of the response. Germany and its allies should therefore do their utmost to empower regional partners and cooperate with them on a comprehensive basis in order to find shared solutions to shared problems.”

Roderich Kiesewetter, MP
Foreign Policy Special Representative for the CDU/CSU parliamentary group, German Bundestag, Berlin

Dr Bärbel Kofler, MP

Dr Bärbel Kofler, MP

© Bärbel Kofler

“Peace policy needs to change: the threats to world peace increasingly come from non-state actors. We must ask ourselves what motivates people to join these movements. Is it the feeling that they are being excluded from opportunities to shape their own future? Myopic dictators are steadily shrinking the space that civil society needs to contribute to decision-making. And if people face a daily struggle for their economic survival, they have no energy left over to make this contribution. Peace policy must therefore create space for civil society – but it must also demand economic justice and social protection. To some extent, this goes beyond human rights – but human rights are the essential basis for making these demands. That’s why we should be campaigning for them everywhere and to an equal extent.”

Dr Bärbel Kofler, MP
Federal Government Commissioner for Human Rights Policy and Humanitarian Aid at the Federal Foreign Office, Berlin

Hannelore Kraft

Hannelore Kraft

@ Land NRW

“In our federal state’s 70th year, the Development and Peace Foundation also has cause for celebration: 30 years of passionate engagement for a world in which war and conflict, hunger and misery, displacement and expulsion will one day be consigned to history for more and more people. In today’s world, that might sound utopian, but ideals have always proved to be stronger than reality – look at Europe after 1945. In North Rhine-Westphalia, we will continue to engage for peace, justice and solidarity in our One World now and in future.”

Hannelore Kraft
Minister-President of North Rhine-Westphalia, Düsseldorf; Chairwoman of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)


Dr Carlos Lopes

Dr Carlos Lopes

@ United Nations

“We live in a geo-political context where the poles of economic growth are shifting, productivity is becoming detached from human labour, with new patterns of production and commoditization of information. These developments require a fresher look of current challenges and opportunities. Sustainability, key word for the current world’s development agenda, needs to unequivocally pair with social inclusion. One of the main reasons for conflicts has its roots on the huge differences in the distribution and exercise of political and economic power. To tackle this issue, guided by the intergenerational contract that stems from the SDGs, we need to both promote and effectively implement inclusion. In so doing inequality can be tackled as well. The sef: has been over the last 30 years an advocate for promoting more global justice. I have no doubt that those pinning hopes on the SDGs will continue to have a reliable partner in the Foundation.”

Dr Carlos Lopes
Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, Addis Abeba

The Right Honourable Paul Martin

The Right Honourable Paul Martin

@ sef:

“While the G20 has had its successes in the past, of late it has fallen short of the mark. It is for this reason I believe it is important to reopen the door to what has become a neglected G20 priority which is the need to strengthen the great multilateral institutions whose objectives are to make globalization work for all. Indeed it is upon this that much of the G20’s legitimacy rests.”

The Right Honourable Paul Martin
Former Prime Minister of Canada, Montreal

Professor Dirk Messner

Professor Dirk Messner

@ DIE

“In the 21st century – the century of the global commons – developing a global culture of cooperation is all about survival. In a world whose population will soon reach nine billion, human development can only succeed if global systemic risks – climate change, other tipping points in the Earth system, international financial market volatility, state failure that threatens international peace, transnational terrorism and global refugee flows – are brought under control. National egotism, geopolitical muscle-flexing and struggles for hegemony and dominance undermine efforts to find solutions to large-scale and interdependent global problems. Cognitive, cultural and political innovation is needed, encompassing all aspects of human civilisation. Citizens, civil societies, countries and corporations must learn to take global commons into systematic account alongside their own particular interests. A global civilisation which succeeds in safeguarding the shared bases of human life and survival cannot be created in a competition between almost 200 nations.”

Professor Dirk Messner
Director, German Development Institute, Bonn


Dr Gerd Müller

Dr Gerd Müller

@ Photothek/BMZ

“A life in dignity for all people within planetary boundaries – that is my One World vision for 2030. We already live in a global village – so sustainable development concerns us all. We can use the opportunities afforded by globalisation and technological progress to build a fairer and more sustainable world. The 2030 Agenda – the pact on the world’s future – provides us with the roadmap we need. Now let us work together to make these ambitious goals a reality!”

Dr Gerd Müller
German Federal Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development, Berlin/Bonn

Michael Müller

Michael Müller

© Senatskanzlei Berlin/Martin Becker

“Today, the Development and Peace Foundation’s vision – a world without borders and without prejudice, without hunger or fear of destruction – is more relevant than ever. To make this vision a reality, we need a united and solidarity-based Europe – a Europe that is secure in its own values and engages for peace and justice.”

Michael Müller
Governing Mayor of Berlin; Deputy Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Dr Rolf Mützenich

Dr Rolf Mützenich

@ Rolf Mützenich

“‘The vision of a world without borders and without prejudice, without hunger or fear of destruction’ is as relevant today as it was 30 years ago. The gap between rich and poor is widening – and not only in the ‘developing’ countries. The wars in Syria, Iraq and Libya, Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the crisis in Ukraine, the onward march of so-called Islamic State, the crisis in the European Union, the rise of the populists – all these developments seem to confirm the impression that the world is spinning out of control. But we must not lose heart. On the plus side, we have the Millennium Development Goals, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and real progress on issues as diverse as poverty reduction, child mortality, illiteracy, hunger, gender equality and much more. I am sure that the Development and Peace Foundation will continue to make a substantial contribution to building a better and fairer world.”

Dr Rolf Mützenich
Deputy Chair of the SPD parliamentary group for Foreign Affairs, Defence Policy and Human Rights, German Bundestag, Berlin

Jan Pronk

Jan Pronk

© Dida Mulder

“A value based reform of the UN system would presently be even more urgent than thirty years ago. At that time the international situation was difficult. Today, it is catastrophic. The threats are enormous: rapid climate deterioration, irreversible loss of biodiversity, ongoing crisis in a footloose global financial system, widening social and economic inequalities, renewed confrontation between major powers, rising nationalism, more authoritarian regimes, widespread violations of human rights, civil wars fed from outside, new forms of terrorism, unprecedented numbers of refugees and displaced persons, to mention a few. Threats such as these cannot be solved at the national level, neither in small countries nor in countries with large resources. All countries lack the capacity to deal with transnational powers and transborder blasts and torrents. Since the beginning of the new Millennium the UN system has been undermined. Further erosion of the system must be halted. It has to be strengthened through reform.”

Jan Pronk
Former Minister for Development Cooperation and Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment in the Dutch government; former UN Special Representative for Sudan, Den Haag

Claudia Roth, MP

Claudia Roth, MP

© sef:

“Today, we are well on the way towards ONE world. However, we are experiencing the end of feel-good globalisation and face immense challenges: wars without borders, displaced people, the climate crisis and global inequality. Time and again, they show us how our actions here and now affect people elsewhere – and tomorrow’s generations. Now more than ever before, our efforts to bring about change and build global cohesion must begin at home. The roadmap for tackling the causes of the immense challenges facing humankind is now in our hands: entitled the Sustainable Development Goals, it was written by the countries themselves. The fact is that in the context of global development towards a world without borders, without prejudice, without hunger and fear of destruction, Germany itself is a developing country. We are all citizens of the world, with only one home: this One World, our planet Earth.”

Claudia Roth, MP
Vice-President of the German Bundestag, Berlin

Martin Schulz

Martin Schulz

@ Martin Schulz

“The European Union faces tougher challenges than ever. It is high time that we committed Europeans stood up and fought for our common Europe. For far too long, we have left the field wide open to those who preach simplistic messages and create divisions, who want to wind up the European project and promote isolationism and exclusion. That needs to end now. We need to start a passionate and committed debate about how we can change and improve Europe so that the goals of peace, freedom, security and prosperity continue to be a reality in the 21st century. Business as usual is not enough. We need a Europe that is responsive to its citizens and capable of addressing and solving the problems we face. Europe must stand for growth and economic progress again, and it must also be more equitable. Europe must help to shape the future. It must be more democratic and transparent and make its contribution to a sustainable peace and more domestic security.”

Martin Schulz
President of the European Parliament, Brussels

Professor Dieter Senghaas

Professor Dieter Senghaas

© sef:

“In a world of foreseeable power shifts at the global level, a world where nationalism is considered as an attractive political strategy once again (and this even in developed countries), in a world in which anarchy threatens or has broken out in a growing number of societies in transition, global governance might be regarded as unrealistic or even utopian. In fact, this guiding principle for peace policy has gained in significance in theory and practice – there is no alternative. In a world characterised by growing diversity of generally politicised interests and collective identities, the goal of global governance endures, offering an effective method – both institutional and psychological – for civilising conflicts at every political level. Now more than ever, it is essential to address the problems that threaten the survival of humankind in a timely and constructive manner, based not on narrow-minded parochialism but on collaborative, farsighted and well-crafted policies that are viable for the future.”

Professor Dieter Senghaas
Peace Researcher, founder member and former longstanding Chair of the Advisory Board of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:), Bremen

Dr Youba Sokona

Dr Youba Sokona

@ Youba Sokona

„Africa has been at the centre of climate policy since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was founded in 1988 by two UN agencies – the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and UN Environment Programme (UNEP), both headed at the time by Africans. The world has passed several important milestones since then, from the Earth Summit in Rio in 1992, which saw the adoption of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), culminating in the adoption in 2015 of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Accord at the UNFCCC’s COP21. Over these three decades, climate diplomacy has recognized the special circumstances of African and other developing countries, enshrining the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities in the negotiating process.
The adoption of the SDGs and the climate agreement provide Africa with a unique opportunity to combine development while pursuing ecological goals that also contribute to the fight against poverty, such as healthcare and renewable energy, while avoiding some of the environmental problems that some developing countries have experienced as they industrialize. This will enable governments to deliver both prosperity and a high quality of life.”

Dr Youba Sokona
Head of the interim Delivery Unit, Africa Renewable Energy Initiative, Abidjan

Achim Steiner

Achim Steiner

@ Achim Steiner

“Over the last three decades, we have witnessed a dawning realization in policy circles of the global nature of the impacts of environmental change and degradation, and progress toward tackling these supranational problems with international cooperation. In the 1980s, the first universal environmental treaty, the Montreal Protocol, was instrumental in repairing the hole in our ozone layer. Almost 30 years on, the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Sustainable Development Goals are aiming through global collaboration to tackle even greater existential threats. We now think of our societies less in narrow and isolationist perspectives, and more in terms of a fundamentally interdependent global community. As globalization continues to integrate our economies and cultures, we will increasingly see responsible policy -- domestic and international -- that recognizes our environment as the foundation of a peaceful and prosperous planet.”

Achim Steiner
Former Executive Director, UN Environment Programme, Nairobi

Dr Frank-Walter Steinmeier

Dr Frank-Walter Steinmeier

© Auswärtiges Amt photothek/Thomas Köhler

“The issue of the world order is as relevant today – albeit in a very different way – as it was 30 years ago, when the Development and Peace Foundation was established. We have overcome the bipolarity of the Cold War, but we do not yet have a new order to replace it. Crisis has become the new normal. At the same time, Germany – perhaps more than any other country – is globally networked and is thus reliant on effective international governance. Working towards a just, peaceful and durable international order is therefore one of Germany’s fundamental foreign policy interests. In this context, we focus on prevention, crisis diplomacy and long-term support for transition processes.”

Dr Frank-Walter Steinmeier
German Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs, Berlin


Professor Ramesh Thakur

Professor Ramesh Thakur

@ Ramesh Thakur

“With the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) functioning as a non-proliferation rather than a prohibition regime, the treaty has exhausted its normative potential in eliminating nuclear threats. The only guarantee of zero nuclear weapons risk is zero nuclear weapons possession. Their existence in the arsenals of nine countries is sufficient guarantee of their proliferation to others and use – if not by design and intent, then through miscalculation, accident, rogue launch or system malfunction – with catastrophic consequences for all life. Conversely, nuclear disarmament is a necessary condition of nuclear non-proliferation. Romanticized faith in the magical powers of nuclear deterrence aside, the choice is between nuclear abolition or cascading proliferation and guaranteed use. The critical policy challenge is how to manage the transition to a post-nuclear world without jeopardizing the security of the existing order anchored in the NPT.”

Professor Ramesh Thakur
Director, Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, The Australian National University, Canberra

Stanislaw Tillich

Stanislaw Tillich

© Sächsische Staatskanzlei/Laurence Chaperon

“Since the fall of the Iron Curtain, the achievements of the people of Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania have been impressive. These nations embarked on the path towards a united Europe and today are not only important partners but also good neighbours and friends. The countries in Central and Eastern Europe draw on their own history, cultures and experience in engineering political transformation. That is why it is important to listen to their voices as we shape the future of our united, peaceful and democratic Europe.”

Stanislaw Tillich
Minister-President of the Free State of Saxony, Dresden;
Deputy Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

Günter Verheugen

Günter Verheugen

CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Michael Thurm/flickr.com

“The 30th anniversary of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:) is a welcome opportunity to draw attention to the European responsibility for a peaceful and just world order. Amid our every-day worries and concerns in Europe and often very petty disputes in the EU, we should not forget our historic responsibility in the face of global risks and trends. Unless we Europeans can speak with one voice and act together, we will fail in our most important task, which is to show the world that peace among so many diverse nations is possible. On their own, Europe’s nation-states are too weak to be global actors. United, however, the European continent can bring its immense capabilities and resources to bear in making our planet a fairer and more peaceful place.”

Günter Verheugen
Former Vice-President of the European Commission, Potsdam

Professor Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker

Professor Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker

@ Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker

“When the Development and Peace Foundation was established on the initiative of Willy Brandt and Johannes Rau, the Cold War still had the world in its grip. Safeguarding peace and strengthening North-South justice was imperative. And that still applies today, 30 years on, as we face the additional challenges of climate change and sustainable development. The sef: is still needed.”

Professor Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker
Co-President of the Club of Rome; member of the International Resource Panel, UNEP, Emmendingen

Dagmar G. Wöhrl, MP

Dagmar G. Wöhrl, MP

@ Dagmar G. Wöhrl

“Stakeholder networking and creative solutions to development challenges will become even more important in future – so the same applies to the work of the sef:. Over the course of its lifetime, we have made progress on poverty, education and health, thanks to the Millennium Development Goals. Now, with the Sustainable Development Goals, we have a pact on the world’s future – which would have been almost inconceivable 30 years ago. But looking at the global development challenges that lie ahead, such as the worsening of the refugee crisis, the growing number of fragile states and armed conflicts, the impacts of climate change and the population explosion in some parts of the world, it is clear that there is still a lot of work to do.”

Dagmar G. Wöhrl, MP
Former Parliamentary State Secretary, Chair of the Committee on Economic Cooperation and Development, German Bundestag, Berlin

Dr Dietmar Woidke

Dr Dietmar Woidke

@ www.brandenburg.de

“I congratulate the Development and Peace Foundation on its 30th anniversary. It is important that organisations such as the sef: highlight global interdependencies and identify possible solutions. Recent events make it clearer than ever that we live in ONE world: conflicts in other parts of the world directly affect us, as we see from the thousands of refugees seeking safety in Europe. What I am hoping for, over the next few years, is a European Union with the heart and the good sense to put the integration of those seeking protection at the top of its agenda and to provide sufficient resources to make this a success. A go-it-alone policy will take us nowhere.”

Dr Dietmar Woidke
Minister-President of Brandenburg; Deputy Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Development and Peace Foundation (sef:)

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